Welcome to Iraq Museum International
Exhibitions
The Secret of Nimrud
One Year Before the Iraq Museum
The Treasures of the Iraq Museum
Iraq's Cultural Heritage Worldwide


Resources
An Archaeologist's Weblog
Members
Museum Store
Museum Open Directory
Iraq Open Directory
Arabic Open Directory
Kurdish Open Directory


UPDATES
June 28, 2005

Artifacts for Sale
on eBay & the Net

Directory Guide
Abbasid Dynasty
Akkadian
Akkadian Epigraphy
Ancient Civilizations
Ancient History
Antiquities Museums
Arab Culture
Arabian Nights
Aramaic Language
Archaeologists
Archaeology/Iraq
Archaeology/Mideast
Archaeology/Museums
Assyrian Culture
Biblical Archaeology
Calligraphy
Computing
Computing Research
Conservation
Forensic Anthropology
GIS/Remote Sensing
Gilgamesh
History of Iraq
History of Islam
History of Kurdistan
History of Middle East
Islamic Architecture
Islamic Art History
Islamic Arts
Islamic Dynasties
Kurdish Culture
Mesopotamia
Methodology
Museum Resources
Organizations
Portable Antiquities
Publications
Sites & Monuments
Sumerian Epigraphy
Theft
World Heritage

Català
Česky
Dansk
Deutsch
Español
Français
Italiano
Japanese
Korean
Nederlands
Norsk
Polska
Português
Română
Russian
Srpski
Suomi
Svenska
Türkçe
Ukranian




JUNE 2005



Aerial view from "The Tigris" showing an area just south of Baghdad near Tell Omar (formerly Seleucia-on-Tigris), where Babylonian demon bowls have been found. Illegal demon bowls, such as the one shown here, are now openly sold on the Internet. (All production photos on this page ©2005 DigitalGlobe, Google and Iraq Museum International.)


Cultural Loss Along The Tigris River

Iraq Museum International announces the start of production of "The Tigris," a feature-length aerial journey up the Tigris River, using high-resolution photography and new computer animation technologies.

The footage library will be available in all major video formats, and an interactive version will allow travel at various speeds.

Audiences will be able to carefully examine the features of the Tigris from altitudes as low as 1500 feet. The digital video production will also circle slowly around sites and cities of interest along the famous river. The best known points include Basra, Ctesiphon, Seleucia, Baghdad, Samarra, Tikrit, Assur, Nimrud, Nineveh and Mosul.


ENDANGERED SITE: ALL OF IRAQ*
Use this archaeological map of Iraq
to pinpoint over 50 sites along the Tigris.
Click to access the high-resolution
version (3800 x 4500 pixels, 1.29M).


The purpose of the production is to show archaeological sites, both major and minor, that remain vulnerable to continual looting, and to give a bird's eye view of the activities of black market dealers.

In addition, other producers, educators and organizations will be able to use the smooth gliding aerial footage for different narrations on other topics such as art, literature, ancient and modern history, the environment, agriculture, commerce, transportation, community development, and reconstruction efforts in Iraq.

Below is an aerial view of the Iraq Museum in Baghdad, with the Tigris River in the distance. Circling the museum reveals the surrounding neighborhoods. Click the links to view the museum compound from 8 different aerial "holding pattern" positions.

Three video clips are also presented below.




Aerial view of the Iraq Museum in Karkh (west Baghdad) on the west bank of the Tigris.
Click here for views facing: N - NE - E - SE - S - SW - W - NW




Aerial view of museum compound. Click image for larger view.




Map of museum compound. Click image for larger view. (Courtesy John M. Russell)






VIDEO CLIP. Zoom shot to the Iraq Museum, Baghdad.
(320x240 mpg file, 6M)




VIDEO TEST CLIP. Fast traveling shot along river.
(320x240 mpg file, 1.3M)




"THE TIGRIS" DEMO CLIP. Long, slow traveling shot.
(640x480 wmv file, 130M - SEE BELOW)




Viewing the Demo Clip from "The Tigris"

Please note that this demo clip has no sound, is not color-corrected, and is a very large Windows Movie (wmv) file.

We welcome your comments on how you would like to use "The Tigris" or footage from this production in your programs, courses or for your organization. If you would like to join our production workgroup at this early stage of production, you would be entitled to non-exclusive use of the footage. Requests for footage once production is complete will be subject to license fees.

Please complete the form below to access the Demo Clip.

Thanks for looking!

Name:


Email:


Comments:
How would you consider using footage from "The Tigris?"






* The World Monuments Fund has announced that its list of 100 most endangered sites now includes the entire country of Iraq, as nominated by the Iraq State Board of Antiquities and Heritage. For more information, visit World Monuments Watch: Country-Wide, Iraq.


About Iraq Museum International  |  Contact
©2005 Iraq Museum International. All rights reserved.